Artnatalia villanueva

Katie Yancey

Artnatalia villanueva
Katie Yancey

Katie Yancey (born in 1985 in Peoria, Illinois) currently lives and works in Portland, Oregon. She obtained her BFA from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2009 and received an MFA in Contemporary Art Practice from Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

Still images from the video Possible Paintings, 2016, Single Channel Video 

Still images from the video Possible Paintings, 2016, Single Channel Video 

I am currently working on a video piece titled Possible Paintings that investigates the representation of painting as a medium and its relationship to spaces outside of the gallery context. These spaces include industrial blue facades, sand dunes close to the ocean, the ocean, an abandoned paper mill close to a waterfall, large piles of dirt, and new sidewalks with young trees in front of empty lots. Through the collection and layering of these various spaces and the presentation of the materials therein, I attempt to expose the connectedness between environments, mediums, and materials.

In the videos I am collecting sounds through the use of sculptural sound-recording devices made out of contact microphones, casted resin, fabric, brass, plastic, and various other materials. These microphones function as a visual element within the videos and the resulting sound, which has been digitally altered, serves as an audible representation of the activation of the space.

Utilizing the intuitive, generative impulse behind poetry, I position meaning among the various layered parts, giving significance to the voice that shapes thought through the expression of an inward listening. It is this reflection inwards that is most critical; the mining of an inner state of being and how the representational world that can be seen, how the expression of a personal voice or feeling can be translated through various formats. This is often felt as failure—the failure to communicate—to bring these thoughts into the physical world.

I am interested in the boundaries of materiality and presentation within video, and I find the possibility to blur and extend the two-dimensionality of digital information into a physical space, and into a relationship with the body, more compelling and pertinent in today’s digital landscape. Through the activation of my own body within the video, I hope to emphasize materiality, process, and the possibility of artistic intent within the digital frame. Using common digital processing techniques in the creation of layered, time-based sequences, along with more craft-oriented material investigations, there is an insistence upon the illusion of separateness and the complexity that surrounds various fields of containment.